Dare Death 3 Preface (Original) “What ASL is to me”

Dare Death 3One day in February 2013, I chanced upon a copy of Squad Leader on eBay. I was a Squad Leader player back when I was in high school. Unfortunately when I went to university, I found a few other things more interesting and I forgot about wargames all together. So, decades later, while I stared at the screen, memories of great times came back and I bought myself that copy. The internet connected me with some very active Squad Leader groups. I planned to learn the game again and get back into it.

I then came across the tiniest military bookstore one day. It’s the size of a small walk-in closet, except that it’s wall to wall military books. There it was, up on a shelf near the ceiling, a shrink wrapped copy of the Advanced Squad Leader Rulebook v2. I asked to have a look at it, and I never put it back down.

The ASLRB is not an easy book to read, so I asked to see a live game one Sunday afternoon. The local ASL’rs would have none of it. Erwin Lau & Lorricount Hall shoved a Pz IV my direction and said “Here, you are in charge of this one.” They then proceed to tell me what to do with my Pz IV every step of the way. I couldn’t fathom why people who I have just met would let me break into their Sunday game and spend that much time teaching me the mechanics, but they did.

It was a fun afternoon but it’s not an event I can attend on a regular basis. Nonetheless, the rulebook became a lot easier to understand now that I have context.

One day I got an email from Don Lazov. He said if I want to learn ASL, he could teach. I know then it’s choice between continuing to read the rulebook and solo’ing scenarios or having a mentor and actively playing. It was a choice between being a tinkerer and an active player.

I said “Yes but give me a few weeks to finish up Chapter A and Chapter B.” I wasn’t sure why I wanted to push it off. He asked again “Do you want to do this or not?”

I jumped in with both feet. Our first scenario was “RPT1 Ferenc Jozef Barracks”.

After that I ran into Witchbottles, who helped me get permission from Rodney Kinney (who created VASL) for permission to use VASL graphics in my blog. To me, Witchbottles is the embodiment of the modern day Renaissance man. We play ASL and we spent countless hours chatting about history and about life.

I don’t remember how I heard about “Malaya Madness” the 2014 ASL tournament in Singapore. I didn’t give it any thought at first but both Don Lazov and Witchbottles thought I absolutely must go. I struggled with it for a while. I mean, paying for flight and hotel to play a boardgame is crazy! I brought up the topic to my wife, expecting her to kill it (for good reasons). She thought about it for a minute and said “Yes”.

I rented a bunk bed in a hostel to save money but I went to Singapore for the tournament. There’s something truly magical about ASL that ties people together. Playing 1 on 1 on a weekend is one thing. Being in a room with other ASL’rs and playing games after games is definitely something else!

I got a bigger group of opponents after the Malaya Madness. I went on to help organise and to promote the 2014 Hong Kong ASL tournament, “The Gin Drinkers’ Revenge”. I was in New York City on Dec 2014 and I jumped on the train and stopped by Albany. It is THE Albany, the New York State ASL Championship. Joe Loece and Gary Trezza are simply some of the best hosts I have ever met. I met so many people at Albany. I met a lot of the best known names in ASL. I decided to shoot a video for these guys and leveraged on that to chat with as many people as I could.

That of course open me up to more venues and to more people. I picked up a chat from Carl Nogueira when I was walking down the street at lunch one day and he wanted to know if I want to play and to learn. I was getting so used to jumping in at that point I said “yes” immediately.

So you see, ASL is about people. ASL is about the guy on the other side of the table. ASL is one of the few good reasons in life that pulls guys together periodically, to share identical experiences and to chat about other thing as well. If you do solo play most of the time, you are truly missing the best thing ASL has to offer.

ASL is about playing. That rulebook is not for reading. It’s for referencing and as such, the INDEX is the command central for the ASL rulebook The value of an ASL kit is much higher when used and played than it will ever get on eBay.

ASL is about self discovery. As we compete with others, we learn more about our fears and shortcomings. We learn about our risk management and our decision making processes. The man to overcome game after game is yourself. This not something you will realize from ASL not played or ASL played solo.

Dare Death is an effort to arouse and to maintain that interest. Dare Death is the embodiment of a group of ASL’rs who play on a regular basis and discuss rules and tactics on live chats when not playing. If enthusiasm sells then Dare Death is a powerful force in ASL.

And enthusiasm sells.

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4 thoughts on “Dare Death 3 Preface (Original) “What ASL is to me”

  1. Jack:

    You should plan to go to the Austin Tournament next year. I’m working on arranging it now myself.

    Currently VASLing with a new full ASL player (live), an SK Player (PBEM), a returning full ASL player (live) and a “time to get back to basics and learn this came correctly” player (PBEM).

    Cheers,

    Mark

    Reply
    • Austin as in Texas? I’d surely love to!

      I became a lot more oriented towards live VASL myself lately, since play time can be managed easier with live VASL. Good that you are investing in new players though!

      Rgds
      Jack

      Reply
  2. Renaissance man? Wow. okay. I know I know a *tiny* bit about many things indeed – but really, it’s more a case of I know about enough to keep us all from going to jail for today (but don’t bet on tomorrow – LOL).

    Jackson is THE kind of “breath of fresh air” to the hobby as a whole that makes it all worthwhile, at least from my POV. There were some words said long ago about this hobby by Matt Shostak “You’ll only get out of ASL what you are willing to put into it.” – By that measure, I know Jackson’s cup runneth over by now. Mine does – every game we get logged, and the many (,many) fireside chats in between them.

    I enjoy assisting newbie ASL and returnabee ASL players into the hobby. For me, it is the most compelling reason to continue playing this (or any of a select few other) wargames. Now, if we can arrange to get Jack to Austin sometime in the next 5 years, I’m sure Chris will come down from Kansas and we can all get in a roaring 3-player game. (smile)

    Cheers, Jack – keep up the excellent work, you’re a benefit to the hobby. – Ciao!

    Jon (aka Witchbottles)

    Reply
    • JON! You quite simply rendered me absolutely speechless with this.

      I do my best to put back into ASL but goodness, your patience with people knows no bounds – and you have a big heart.

      My cup does runneth over, not so much in what I invest back into ASL but man, the people I otherwise wouldn’t ever get to meet.

      I cannot start to describe to people that REALLY – it’s not about the purchases or even the playing .. it’s ALWAYS about the friend across the table.

      Jon – thank you for that.

      Man .. what if .. what if we can get that 3 way game going. What if. It will definitely be a pleasure of a lifetime (plus an honor, I might add) to meet you.

      A REAL HONOR.

      Take good care Jon.

      Warm regards,
      Jack

      Reply

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